David

Aug 212017
 

System administrators of the world, if a VM experiences a problem that takes down business-critical application, your job is to get minimize the impact to the business. You are caught in a difficult decision.

Do you repair the VM as quickly as possible, but possibly lose traces of what went wrong. In doing so, that loss of evidence might mean that this outage returns at a future point in time.

…or…

Do you prolong the outage and continue to impact to the business to investigate and get to the root cause of what actually happened so that it does not happen again?

The business almost always pushes you to perform the former, which puts you in a bad position if the VM issue returns.

Now you can do both.

For those of you on VMware vSphere platforms, the latest revision of VMware’s PowerCLI PowerShell extensions contain a little publicized feature that allows you to capture the production server’s error state and preserve it for later investigation so that you can repair the VM as fast as possible to minimize the impact to the business.

Read more about this exciting new feature and how you can leverage the power of this feature to capture the production error state in our new free whitepaper from Heraflux!

Aug 212017
 

My company, Heraflux Technologies, is proud to announce a new ebook as part of our joint partnership with Pure Storage! This ebook, entitled Overcoming SQL Server Storage Challenges, discusses the current state of infrastructure technologies and how it interacts and impacts the performance of Microsoft’s flagship database engine SQL Server. Arguably, storage has historically been the slowest part of the infrastructure stack underneath the database, so much so that the core database engine makes some assumptions that it will always be the case. Modern CPUs, memory, and even the network are much less a bottleneck than administrators commonly realize. Even modern SQL Server in-memory features, such as in-memory OLTP and columnstore indexes, are heavily dependent on the performance of the storage underneath them.

Learn more about how SQL Server and the enterprise storage your data rests on complement and contradict each other in this exciting new ebook authored for Pure Storage! Download this exciting PDF today!

Aug 082017
 

One of the challenges with any SQL Server business continuity strategy is backing up your databases and logs on a frequent basis. With Windows, we’ve known how to accomplish this for years. But, with SQL Server on Linux, you can accomplish the same task with just a few different twists. It is similar to mounting a network share as a new driver letter in Windows. Let’s explore how to back up your databases to a network share with Linux!

Continue reading »

Jul 272017
 

In the last blog post, we added additional drives to the SQL Server machine so that we can scale out our storage workload. Let’s move the tempdb objects to one of these new drives!

By default, our tempdb files are in the system database folder at /var/opt/mssql/data.

We previously created a folder at /var/opt/mssql/data/tempdb01 for these files. Moving them is straightforward, once you know the file system structure. The following commands will move them to the new location, and I also add additional files to equal the four vCPUs I have on this SQL Server VM. The file growth is my model database’s default of 64MB for this instance. Do as you would normally do with SQL Server on Windows with tempdb file counts and separation of duties for your workload.

Restart the instance to make the new settings take effect.

You’ll notice you now have the properly configured tempdb data and log files in this location.

Also, just like in Windows, the old files are not removed upon relocation. Go clean those up.

That’s it!

In the next step we’ll set up this VM to be able to write backups across the network to a file share, just like we do in Windows! Stay tuned!

Jul 242017
 

One of the biggest differences with managing SQL Server Linux is with drive presentation. With Windows, we’d all scream if we saw a SQL Server with just one drive (C:) and everything piled on it. The same goes for any other operating system, including Linux. But, how do we get the additional drives added and configured properly? It’s (not) the easiest, but it’s straightforward! Let’s walk through it.

Continue reading »

 Posted by at 9:29 am  Tagged with:
Jul 242017
 

I’ll be speaking at two New England area SQL Server user groups in the next few days! First, tonight I’ll be at the Portsmouth, NH, SQL Server Users Group speaking on the newly announced SQL Server on Linux. It’s going to be a blast showing folks that SQL Server on Linux is a viable alternative for businesses out there.

Next, tomorrow night I’ll be at the downtown Boston SQL Server Users Group tomorrow night for a session on Performance Tuning for SQL Server VMs. This session gets a little free-form, as I encourage all attendees to bring your specific questions, challenges, (mis)conceptions, opinions, etc. to the table and let it all out.

RSVP for these events if you’re in the area, and if not, ping me and let me know if your user group would like a presentation on these topics!

 Posted by at 9:11 am